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  THE MARVELOUS COSTUMES in the new HBO hit, BOARDWALK EMPIRE, were brilliantly designed by John Dunn, who brings the early twenties era of prohibition in Atlantic City to vivid life.  Mob boss Nucky Thompson’s manner of dress was fashioned on the Prince of Wales, “who was like the David Beckham of the early Twenties,” Dunn said.  Nucky’s lover, Lucy Danziger, played by Paz de la Huerta, appears in the lavish style of the day, complete with furs and brocades and exquisite lingerie.

“The fashion in ‘Empire’ was significant,” Dunn says.  “In 1920, the corset had almost disappeared.  Women had just started wearing bras and panties for the first time. It was when Chanel started designing.  It was the birthplace of modern clothing.”    

Jewelry wasn’t forgotten in the exciting costume plan.  One of the outstanding pieces was a pair of hanging white shell earrings.  Another interesting design featured a pair of medium sized ball earrings swinging off little thin chains.  Victorian Era was over; these were conservative, if a bit glitzy.

Playing a major role in one of the early series was a necklace once owned by the mother of Jimmie Darmody, Nucky’s protégé.  It was given to her by Jimmie’s father, who abandoned them both shortly thereafter, causing his mother to sell it just to keep a roof over their heads. The necklace was a fine gold chain with a large filigree pendant. 

Now, years later, Jimmie spots an almost identical necklace in a jewelry display window.  And, he happens to be flush, since he has just recently pulled off a liquor hijacking with a very young Al Capone. Jimmie uses the ill-gotten money to buy the new necklace, which he presents to his now-stripper mother.  She is thrilled, and says it is worth at least $1,000, no small amount back in the 20s.  But…that’s not the end!  She doesn’t have the necklace long before Jimmie steals it back to pay off a debt to Nucky!  And on it goes…

Oh, the fashion, fun, frivolity and violence of yesteryear on the Boardwalk!  This is gangsta’ land at its best, expensive clothing, jewelry and all. Ya gotta see it!

 

IN THE MEANTIME, YOU MIGHT LOOK OVER SOME GREAT LOOKING VINTAGE-LIKE JEWELRY.  YOU’LL HAVE ALL THE BRAVADO AND ELEGANCE OF THE 20S IN YOUR OWN STORE:

 

 

                    SPRING PRADA-STYLE IS BOLD AND URBAN

THE LOOK PUT FORTH by Prada for Spring is surprisingly assertive, and remarkably urban.  Sizzling colors give a tropical heat flavor to a collection that literally vibrates with excitement and   refinement.  Overall, this is a bold introduction to Spring, trendy and classic, simultaneously.

Orange is an unusually strong color in the Prada collection, along with green and royal blue. Not that black is absent:  The little black dress is here with ruffles and fun furry wraps in black and white stripes. A dynamite effect! 

Following the direction expressed by designers in New York, skirts are tight, with hemlines generally to the knee.  Miuccia Prada combines them with loose jackets and tops and plenty of frills for a romantic, feminine allure.  Dresses, from gay sun dresses to more sophisticated evening styles, are tight fitted. 
                                                      Patterns

Almost everything has a structured look, giving a finished appeal to the defined cuts and patterns.   Patterns are pandemic, with stripes a major design factor.  Monkeys likewise play happily over several outfits.

Accessories are equally outspoken.  Sunglasses are big, bold, colorful, and often silly, like a huge pair of orange framed glasses that look like water goggles.  Handbags are small, clutch-like, and also crafted in bright color, such as that big-time orange.  One of the most charming looks is a very long black ribbon tied around the neck and made into a big bow with streamers hanging down to the waist.  Wow!

HERE ARE SOME GREAT ACCESSORIES TO PAIR WITH THE PRADA LOOK FOR SPRING:

 

Comments (0) Posted by Mary McGarry on Monday, November 1st, 2010


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